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Persian Cat 101: The Different Kinds Of Persian Cats

Persian Cat 101: The Different Kinds Of Persian Cats

The pleasant Persian cat is known for being silent and docile. Although Persians often tend to be calm, they also have an air of nobility in their aura. They might not be quick to hiss or scratch, but it does not mean that it is okay for them to be bothered by loud kids or other pets in the home.

Nonetheless, those that treat Persian cats with the dignity they deserve will be compensated with a caring lap cat that takes pleasure in a good petting. If you want a friend that will return all your commitment and love in kind, the Persian might be the right feline for your family. Learn all you need to know about them below!

Persian Cats Have a Mystical Origin

Persian Cats Have a Mystical Origin

Although Persian felines can be traced back to the 1600s, their origin tale is still somewhat of an enigma.

It's commonly thought that Persian cats originated in Mesopotamia, which was later named Persia, therefore the name "Persian" pet cats. Ultimately, this nation becomes what we contemporary know to be Iran. 

One theory claims that an Italian nobleman called Pietro Della Valle brought eight Persian cats home to western Europe after seeing them during his trip to Iran. Similar theories postulate that they were brought to Europe by sailors (who commonly brought kitties aboard for luck), merchants, and travelers.

Whatever the origin story is, as soon as Persians arrived on the western side of the world, they swiftly turned into one of the world's most loved breeds.

Physical Qualities

Physical Qualities

Persian felines are medium-sized, usually weigh between 7 and 12 pounds, and averages at 10 to 15 inches tall. These cats have a strong body and thick, lean legs.

Persians Have Not Always Had Flat Faces

Persians Have Not Always Had Flat Faces

Persians are possibly best known for their flat faces, yet you might be surprised to learn that Persians didn't always have this facial feature. They didn't develop this unique attribute until a hereditary anomaly occurred in a kindle of kitties in the 1950s.

When the kindle was born with flat faces, Persian breeders liked the appearance and started to selectively reproduce this type of Persians until it became a more common attribute. Although the flat face, formally known as the peke-face, is common, it can lead to several health problems. It's not unusual for Persians to have teary eyes, troubled breathing, respiratory problems, and problems in connection to eating. Persians with longer faces, also known as "doll face" Persians, bear the closest resemblance to their Iranian forefathers.

Persians Have Unbelievably Thick Coats

Persians Have Unbelievably Thick Coats

Another unique Persian feature is their long, glamorous layers. They have a shorter undercoat and a long, silky topcoat. These two layers tend to shed a lot, so that might be something that you want to consider when getting one.

If you're considering embracing a Persian or already have a Persian and have a lot of cat hair at home, here's a tip: buy a vacuum specially created to suck up cat hair, placed some purposefully stashed lint rollers around your house, and quit wearing black.

Persian cats likewise require regular bathing and brushing approximately every six weeks. Some Persian feline owners get their pet's hair cut very short in what's called a lion trim. Obviously, it's a parent's choice, but in my opinion, it can be rather charming and helps keep the house tidier.

Persians Aren't Big Hoppers

Persians Have Unbelievably Thick Coats

Unlike many other cats, Persian isn't known for their capability to jump into the air and even leap from the furniture. Why? Their stocky bodies aren't the best for aerodynamics, so Persians commonly prefer to stay securely on the ground.

Persians Made Their Way to America Around the 1900s

Persians Made Their Way to America Around the 1900s

It's believed that Persian felines showed up in the US sometime after 1895. When the Feline Fanciers' Association was founded in 1906, Persian cats were among the organization's first registered breeds.

Since then, Persians have turned into one of the most loved breeds in America. According to the Feline Fanciers' Organization, Persians are in the 4th place of the most prominent breeds in 2020.

Persian felines are among the world's most prominent feline breeds. But did you know the many different variations that can be categorized in this breed?

Persians Come in a Variety Of Colors and Types

Persians Come in a Variety Of Colors and Types

Despite their appearances in cat food commercials, Persians come in a wide range of colors and types. Along with the white or silver Persians, we all recognize that these quiet kitties can have grey, orange, black, tortoiseshell, and calico coats.

You may be familiar with the commercial-Esque Himalayan Persians, but did you know there are also Doll Faced, Bicolor, and Chinchilla Persian cats?

Doll Face Persian

 Doll Face Persian

Doll Face Persian is also known as Classic Persians. This variation is thought to be the closest to the early Persian cats. Its nose is a typical size, which is proportional to its face. Unlike Peke-Faced Persians, these types of Persian have a nose that extends outward. Because of this, Doll Face Persian felines can breathe easier than some other Persian cat types. They also experience minor eye staining and eye draining problems.

These felines generally do not experience the illnesses Persians are known for. They don't have the squeezed facial features. But even though they don't experience several illnesses, they are still a high-maintenance type. They call for a routine brushing schedule because of their two-layer coats.  

If you want to avoid respiratory and eye concerns in your Persian cat, this is the perfect one for you.

Peke-Face Persian

Peke-Face Persian

Peke-Face Persians have the more commonly accepted Persian cat features. This breed's name originates from their resemblances to Pekingese dogs that have the genetic mutation which causes the flat face of this type.

These cats have a square-shaped head, a tiny nose, and a long jaw. They likewise have round cheeks and huge circular eyes. This facial structure makes Peke-Face Persian cats have trouble breathing. If this type of Persian cat has a cold, it becomes nearly impossible for them to breathe generally. Most of these Persians experience asthma. Usually, their noses appear to be set straight in between their eyes.

Peke-Face Persians are a high-maintenance breed. In addition to regularly brushing their layers, owners have to frequently clean these cat's eyes. Their eyes have drainage problems, which can create hair staining unless regularly taken care of.

Chinchilla Persian

Chinchilla Persian

This variation of Persian cats is very striking. They have thick, bushy layers. They were initially named after the South American rodent that likewise possesses a thick, white coat.

While there are a couple of color variations, Chinchilla Persians are typically silvery white. Their lips, nose, and their doll-like eyes are rimmed in black. These felines have a light undercoat and a subtly-tinted topcoat. They also typically have green or blue eyes.

Since Chinchilla Persian felines are a pedigree, they commonly show health issues. They are susceptible to kidney disease and heart problems. They also sometimes have flat faces, which can cause breathing problems.

Exotic Shorthair

Exotic Shorthair

The Exotic Shorthair was produced to be the short hair version of a Persian feline. This variant shows the most typical Persian attributes. They have a level face and large eyes, but unlike the longhair variants, these cats can groom themselves.

Regrettably, their facial features cause conventional health problems related to Persian cats. They usually have problems breathing and can show drainage problems. Additionally, these felines are extra spirited than conventional longhair Persians. They are incredibly caring and don't like being laid off.

Teacup Persian

Teacup Persian

Teacup Persians are bred to be small. Breeders aim to create the tiniest Persian cats feasibly. And while these are adorable, you might want to reconsider before getting a Teacup Persian.

Full-sized Persians already experience a variety of health problems. And considering that these cats are reproduced to be small, their chances of experiencing health issues become exponential. Persian pet cats already have small-squished faces. And the teacup's smaller-sized faces make it harder still for the Teacup Persians to breathe.

These felines additionally have difficulties controlling their body temperature and managing stress and anxiety. Likewise, given that these are a highly reproduced variant, they generally include a high price tag.

The Feline Fanciers' Association Persian Cat Color Divisions

In addition to these types, The CFA has seven color divisions of Persian felines. These are the classifications identified for pet cat show purposes.

  • Solid Color
  • Silver & Golden - This variant exhibits what is known as "tipping." Chinchilla Persians fall under this color.
  • Smoke & Shaded - Shaded Persians have a white undercoat and a subtly colored overcoat. Smoked ones have dark overcoats and white undercoats.
  • Tabby -Tabby Persians are further classified right classic, mackerel, and patched.
  • Particolor -Tortoiseshell Persians fall under this category.
  • Bicolor - Calico Persians are under this color division.
  • Himalayan

Last Thoughts

All right, we know that is a lot. We hope you now have a much better understanding of Persian feline variations! Just keep in mind, there is only one Persian feline breed. But there are different variants based on color, hair length, built, and facial features.

What type of Persian cat do you have? Did you find something new in our article? We would like to know what you think in the comments!

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