Skip to content

Follow KittyNook!

Free shipping worldwide above USD50 | 30-Day free returns

Get in touch with us

Taking Care of Your Diabetic Cat: Weight Loss and More

Taking Care of Your Diabetic Cat - KittyNook
Your feline has been tested for diabetes mellitus. What now?
 
You might be terrified of what the future holds for your precious pet, but cats with diabetes can now live long and healthy lives because of advancements in innovation. The trick is that you, as the owner, have to be dedicated to caring for your feline throughout his/her disorder. Diabetes isn't a death sentence for pets. Here are some things to aid you in caring for your diabetic person pet cat.
 
If your cat is getting insulin therapy and you switch to a reduced carb diet regimen--without reducing the insulin dosage-- has certain risk factors. You will certainly be putting your cat in considerable danger for a hypoglycemic crisis. Talk to your vet before doing the switch.
 

The Basics of Feline Diabetes

All cells of the body use sugar as their source of energy. Nonetheless, for sugar to give the cell nutrients, the glucose needs to get in the cell. Insulin, a product created by the pancreas, is the substance that tells the 'front door' of the cell to open and allow the sugar inside.
 
Suppose this system is interfered with for any factor. In that case, the sugar can not go into the cell, and consequently, blood glucose levels increase in the bloodstream, while the cells go 'hungry.'
 
There are two types of diabetes—type 1 and type 2. Type 2 is the more usual form in both people and pet cats.
 
Type 1 diabetes occurs when the beta cells of the pancreas are not able to generate sufficient insulin.
 
Two problems define type 2 Diabetes. The first is type 1 diabetes, which decreased the ability of the pancreas to secrete insulin. The second problem is insulin resistance. To put it simply, the receptors on the cell wall would typically unlock the cell to allow the glucose in when insulin 'knocks,' stop 'paying attention' to the insulin. The cells ignore the signal that the insulin is sending. The glucose is not transferred within the cell, leading to a raised blood sugar level and cellular 'malnourishment.' The elevated blood glucose, consequently, sends a signal to the pancreas asking it to produce more insulin. The high insulin may somewhat bypass the insulin resistance resulting in more glucose going in. However, ultimately the pancreas can end up being tired or worn out' results from chronic hyperglycemia. Sugar toxicity ruins the whole body-- specifically the pancreas and its insulin-producing cells. A vicious cycle after that takes place as the insulin-producing cells are harmed, causing less insulin to be produced.
 

What Happens On the Checkup?

After your cat has been diagnosed with diabetes, you must see your vet regularly. Your cat will require routine checkups to inspect blood sugar levels. This is to ensure that he/she maintains the right amount of insulin. When your cat goes into a checkup, the vet will ask you to not feed your cat twelve hours before the examination. During the checkup, your veterinarian will draw blood and administer blood glucose readings. People that have diabetes can examine their blood sugar levels in the house. However, this is not advisable with cats. A routine checkup once every three months will be asked of you.
When your pet has diabetic issues, you must make sure that your cat gets the correct insulin dosage twice a day. The amount of insulin required for your cat will differ according to your cat's case. Usually, they receive a dosage of 3-5 units. The time of insulin shots is twice a day. You must follow this maintenance for your cat. Your cat will need to receive insulin 12 hours apart. Most find it easier to give shots at the same time each morning and night.
It is not difficult to learn how to give your cat insulin injections. Your veterinarian will walk you through the procedure, and then you can duplicate this at home. Your vet will typically suggest that you give your feline injections between the shoulder blades in the neck's scruff. With persistence and practice, your cat will barely feel the injections. Most diabetic cats even know when they will need the injection and may remind you by meowing.

Getting the Right Materials

Having the right products available to treat your diabetic pet cat is very important. You will require a vial of insulin as suggested by your veterinarian, syringes, and alcohol swabs. Order your insulin ahead of time because it may take a while for you to have them. Your vet could likewise suggest giving your diabetic cat supplements. Cuddling your cat promptly after she or he receives their shot is helpful to reduce their anxiety. We also recommend having some numbers of your vet. Having contact with at least two 24-hour emergency veterinarian centers readily available for your cat won't hurt.

Early Development / Early Symptoms of Diabetes In Felines

 

Although the actual medical diagnosis of diabetes needs a thorough physical exam and lab testing of both blood and urine by your vet, you might observe specific signs that you might observe at home that can show the existence of an issue. None of the clinical signs listed below specify diabetes mellitus. However, it might show one of several early conditions of diabetes in felines. So regardless, if you notice these indications, do not wait to take your pet cat to the veterinary care for assessment--preferably sooner, instead of later on.   Many proprietors report their pet cat is drinking the pet's water bowl or the sink, bathtub, or bathroom. This sign could additionally show kidney disease, urinary tract infection, liver problems, and other hormonal problems, amongst various other problems.   Typically the first sign that a pet cat is peeing more than usual is that there are even more and larger globs of pee in the can or urine areas outside the litter box. A veterinarian must assess pet cats with excessive peeing to figure out the underlying reason.

Increased appetite (polyphagia) frequently accompanied by weight management

Numerous diabetic pet cats have a ferocious craving, frequently annoying their owners for even more food after cleaning their bowl. Many proprietors might not immediately realize, specifically if their cat has long hair, that despite their feline's limitless cravings, they are losing weight. This is unsafe no matter the reason, so if you see this indication, have your feline examined by your vet sooner as opposed to later.   Typically speaking, the chance of these previously mentioned indications indicating diabetes mellitus in your feline is boosted if your pet cat is overweight/obese (or 'big-boned' or whatever else some people may call it to prevent trouble) as well as eating predominantly or specifically a dry type of food. Such pet cats are often referred to as 'pre-diabetic' in lots of veterinary circles. These cats are simply waiting for a justification--illness, medication, stress, and anxiety--to press them over the line into full-on diabetes.

Cat Insulin And Treatment Of Diabetes

When your pet has diabetic issues, you must make sure that your cat gets the correct type of insulin and the correct insulin dose twice a day. The types of insulin required for your cat will differ according to your cat's case. Usually, they receive a dosage of 3-5 units, twice a day. You must follow this maintenance for your cat. Your cat will need to receive insulin 12 hours apart. Most find it easier to give shots at the same time each morning and night.

It is not difficult to learn how to give your cat insulin injections. Your veterinarian will walk you through the procedure, and then you can duplicate this at home. Your vet will typically suggest that you give your feline injections between the shoulder blades in the neck's scruff. With persistence and practice, your cat will barely feel the injections. Most diabetic cats even know when they will need the injection and may remind you by meowing.
 

What Foods Should You Give To Cats With Diabetes?

  • No Dry Food
  • All cats can be transitioned to a proper diet regimen (no dry food) if the owner disciplines the cat enough.
  • Steer clear of from food with gravy--they are high in carbohydrates. The same is true for the majority of food with sauces. Higher protein and low fat is also the goal. Nonetheless, you will certainly keep in mind that most commercial foods are reduced in protein and high in fat. Why? Because protein is expensive and fat is low-cost. Cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they are made to consume other animals--not grains and vegetables.
  • Get them on a low-carbohydrate diet plan ASAP.
  • Steer clear from 'prescription' type of diet. They are expensive, reduced in quality, have species-inappropriate ingredients, and are not necessarily low in carbohydrates. There is no reason to invest your hard-earned money on veterinarian-prescribed diet regimens.
 
Avoid feeding dry food to any cat for numerous reasons (high in carbs, high in plant-based proteins, microbial and microfungal mycotoxin contamination, and so on). Urethral obstructions and also cystitis are widespread troubles seen in kittens fed dehydrated food. Urethral obstructions hurt, severe (fractured bladder), and extremely expensive to deal with. Cystitis is additionally extraordinarily uncomfortable and also often triggers the cat to stop utilizing the can.
 
You might say, "but my feline drinks plenty of water, so dry food is simply great for him/her!" Numerous studies have revealed that when all water sources are considered, felines on wet food consume double the amount of water than a dry food-fed cat. This is even though pet cats on canned foods rarely drink water from a dish. Cats on dry food do not fill their water deficit at the water bowl--regardless of just how much wishful thinking human beings engage in to justify feeding this kind of diet.
 
It can be relatively suggested that water is one of the essential nutrients for all living beings. Dehydration is an extremely significant concern, and your diabetic cat is in a precarious scenario as it is. We do not require them to worsen their condition by jeopardizing their hydration standing.
 
I will repeat this: cats will ultimately eat canned food if the human executes a healthy dose of willpower. It can be more challenging or more comfortable with a diabetic pet cat. The challenging component is the truth that they need to eat as they get insulin, so it is harder to use appetite as an incentive. Nonetheless, several cats with diabetes have a ferocious craving that can help shift to canned food.
 
I see people quite far prematurely on these persistent, dry food-addicted felines. Some felines will undoubtedly take several weeks to several months to transition. Hold your horses, and do not quit!
 

Carbohydrates

Diabetes in cats is just one of the most usual feline endocrine diseases and, while we do not know all of the reasons for this illness, we do understand that many diabetic pet cats discontinue needing insulin or have their insulin needs considerably decrease once their nutritional level is lowered to a much more species-appropriate level.
 
Making a diabetic feline have a carbohydrate-rich diet is comparable to putting gas on the fire and wondering why you can not put the fire out. While some cats are extra conscious of the damaging effects of carbohydrates than others, the bottom line is that cats are obligate predators and also are not created naturally to take in a high carb diet regimen or one that is water-depleted (dry kibble).
 

Obesity

 
Along with the dietary carbohydrate degree, we likewise are required to attend to managing calorie intake of any food that we pick to feed to our pet cats.
 
Adipocytes (fat cells) secrete a compound that makes the body's cells immune to insulin (Type 2 diabetic issues).
 
Portion control has recently been more critical as pet food manufacturers approach making even more reduced carbohydrate types of food. Bear in mind that we obtain our calories from 3 nutrient courses: proteins, fats, and carbohydrates. The portion of calories that originate from these three nutrients has to amount to 100%. Consequently, if we lower the number of carbs in the food to < 10%, 90-95% of the overall calories need to come from fat and protein. Given that that fat is cheap and protein is expensive, you can see that revenue margin drives pet food producers to generate high fat/low protein foods when they make low carb items.
 

What About Prescription Diets?

A 'Prescription' diet is nothing but an industry-coined term and holds no legal significance.
 
To put it simply, these diets consist of no active ingredient that actually needs a prescription. The term 'prescription diet regimen' is just a creative marketing tool between big brands and vets.
 

Weight Problems and Diabetic issues

Most people know that diabetes mellitus is found more in overweight humans than with people closer to optimal body weight. The same holds for a cat with diabetes. Fat cells create a compound that causes the body's cells to come to be immune to insulin. This is the reason why weight loss and weight management are important for diabetic cats. This insulin resistance is the characteristic of Type 2 diabetes. As stated above, this is the most typical form in cats.

Pet cats are designed to use healthy proteins and fats for their power--not carbohydrates. They lack the needed enzymes to utilize carbs to fulfill their energy needs successfully. When the carb degree of an obligate carnivore's diet regimen is more than it ought to be--bear in mind that a bird or a mouse is just 2%-3% carbohydrates, and dry foods consist of between 35%-50% carbs--the excess carbs are stored as fat. The raised fat cells, consequently, promote Type 2 diabetic issues via a boost in insulin resistance.

That stated if calories that come in exceed calories that go out--regardless of whether the calories originate from healthy protein, fat, or carbohydrates--the pet cat will undoubtedly put on weight. This is why portion control is essential no matter what diet plan you are feeding.

The bottom line is that humans are designed to utilize carbs, whereas cats are not.

We can state that some carbohydrates, such as grain flour, are even worse than other carbohydrates. Still, ideally, we need to make every effort to maintain the feline diet regimen's carbohydrate level at a level that would be found in nature.

Critical Points

 


Many felines that remain in a diabetic state no longer need any insulin injections when they are ultimately fed a good diet. Others will certainly always require some insulin; however, the quantity necessary to preserve appropriate blood glucose degrees is nearly always dramatically reduced once the cat gets on a low carbohydrate diet regimen.
 
If you alter your diabetic pet cat's diet to one with lower carbohydrates, he will, in all probability, INSTANTLY (not days or weeks later) decrease in the dose of insulin
 
It might even instantly go into diabetic remission, have normal blood glucose levels, and not require any insulin whatsoever.
 
If this warning is disregarded, you might quite possibly wind up with a feline in a hypoglycemic situation (precariously low blood sugar levels) which can cause fatality or brain damage.
 
If I can scream this from the roofs, I would.
 
Having feline diabetes is unquestionably a challenge for our pets and us. It also needs a great deal of patience and love. It is not always uncomplicated to look after an illness and also ailing cat. However, you can anticipate your diabetic person cat with the ideal treatment to have years and years of high quality of life.
 
Follow KittyNook's Blog

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published

From our Instagram

Experience The KittyNook Difference

We put out Customers First

About Us

Free Worldwide Shipping Avaliable

Wherever you are

Read More

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

Easy Returns within 30 Days

Read More
()
ago check_circle Verified
()
ago check_circle Verified
()
ago check_circle Verified
()
has purchased Lazy Cat Slippers 😻
ago check_circle Verified
()
has purchased Cat-Walk Necklace 😻
ago check_circle Verified
()
has purchased Sweet-Dreams Calming Pet Bed 😻
ago check_circle Verified
()
ago check_circle Verified
()
has purchased Kit-Tea Infuser Cat Mug 😻
ago check_circle Verified
()
has purchased Waterproof Cat Litter Mat 😻
ago check_circle Verified
()
has purchased KittyNook Purr-fect Cat Pouch 😻
ago check_circle Verified
()
has purchased Invigorating Cat Laser Toy 😻
ago check_circle Verified
()
has purchased For The Love of Cats E-Book 😻
ago check_circle Verified
()
ago check_circle Verified
()
has purchased Flower Cat Automatic Fountain 😻
ago check_circle Verified
()
has purchased Nordic Style Cat Painting 😻
ago check_circle Verified
()
has purchased Best Cat Dad Ever Tee 😻
ago check_circle Verified
Get 10% off! arrow_drop_up